How Often Should I Blog?

The answer to this question is not an easy one. Unfortunately, there is just no cookie-cutter strategy for how frequently you should blog.

However, there are several points to keep in mind when seeking success with your blog…

You Have to Build a Reader Base

As a new blog, you will have to put some time into the content. Blogging is not a “build it and they will come” type of industry.

The internet is saturated with content, and you have to work to get your voice heard and noticed. Presence is key– let the internet know you are here and you have something of value to offer.

If you are starting out, you can post anywhere from once per month to a few times per month. This way, you are committed to getting your blog out there but not stressing yourself out.

If you’re running a more established blog, you have more flexibility. You can post once a day, a few times a week, once a week, or occasionally.

In any case, you will want to stay consistent with your output. The more content you put up, the easier it is for you to be discovered and for people to engage with you. Consistency helps hold people’s focus.

It’s About Quality, Not Quantity

What matters more than how much content you put out is the quality of content you put out.

Why do people come to read your blog in the first place? Because they are seeking some sort of value. It’s not of any concern to your readers how much content you’re publishing if it doesn’t offer something of substance.

Quality content is what generates engagement. Quality content is what generates leads.

Remember that the purpose of content marketing is to offer value and demonstrate expertise to your target market. This can only be accomplished if your content is delivering that purpose.

Blog Strategically, Not Just Frequently

Sure, blogging with some sort of frequency is important. If you consider that your content is your product, you will want to keep offering it so you keep people coming back. The success of content is measured in views, engagement, shares, and links. You need to keep this in mind as you dedicate time to your blog. It’s not always about creating a new product– or content –it’s about driving up those metrics.

One in ten blog posts is compounding, meaning that organic searches increase its traffic over time (HubSpot, 2016). And over its lifetime, one compounding blog post creates as much traffic as six decaying posts (HubSpot, 2016). Because of this, HubSpot dedicates time to update their old posts to capitalize on this traffic trend. So blog success isn’t necessarily dependent on your posting frequency, but more so the strategy you use to drive traffic.

Also keep in mind that the more content you publish, the more search engines will notice and the more you will have to work with. But at the same time, you don’t want to publish so much that you burn your readers or yourself out. The strategy is key in blogging.

Pro tip: Make use of guest bloggers, who can provide great content for you on your blog and freshen things up for your readers.

What is the Major Source for Your Blog Traffic?

Search engines, social media, or direct traffic? What source gets you the most traffic?

Search engines favor longer-form, quality articles. If they’re really good pieces they will continue to rank in search engines. If you get the majority of traffic from search engines, you can get away with posting less.

Social media, on the other hand, is far more demanding. If you get most of your traffic from social networks, you will need to be posting at a higher frequency. And that content is typically better if it’s short-form, in listicle format.

If you get most of your traffic from email subscribers, your frequency will fall in between posting to please search engines and posting to please social.

Experiment!

All of the most successful blogs have experimented with the frequency of their posting at one time or another in order to understand what schedule best suits their audience.

We strongly encourage you to do the same. Every blog is unique and what will work best for each blog is unique as well.

Summary

Every blog is different, but every blog must produce quality content if it has any hope at succeeding. Quality will always win over quantity. The strategy is more important than just frequency.

Bear in mind the source of your traffic when considering the frequency, but embrace that the internet is a fickle being and experimentation is the best approach to learning what works best for your blog.

Looking for more assistance with your blog? Reach out to CommCore Marketing with questions.

9 Tools for Optimizing your Social Media

By now you know that social media for your business is a must but, if you have any experience with it at all, you’re probably aware of how time consuming it can be. Managing your social sites can be even more cumbersome than managing your website.

Luckily, there’s no shortage of tools out there to help you manage your social strategy. Here are nine to get you started:

 

  1. Evernote

What It Does: Evernote is both a web extension available on most browsers and an app. It allows you to clip webpages and images, find text in images, and keep all your notes organized. It also has a messaging feature so that you can discuss and share your notes with others.

The plus and premium versions offer features like saving important emails and annotating pdf files. You can essentially build your own web database with this software and compile a rich resource of content to use on social media.
Who Else is Using It: 200 million users

 

  1. Feedly 

What It Does: It’s a content marketer’s dream. Feedly aggregates content from web browsers and mobile devices and compiles it into useful news feeds for the user to customize and share. You can monitor news by getting keyword alerts from Google, and it even connects with various softwares like Evernote, Slack, and Trello to optimize business usage.

Who Else is Using It: MIT, Zendesk, Foundry Group, and 12 million other users

 

  1. MeetEdgar

What It Does: This is a social media management software that you definitely need to know about. MeetEdgar uses and reuses your best content to optimize post views. Edgar offers a categorized library with types of content. You can then schedule the type of content to post at the right time on the right social channel and Edgar will take over from there, week after week. Then Edgar stores the content for later use so he can share it after he runs out of material thereby optimizing post views.

Who Else is Using It: Neil Patel, DigitalMarketer, CopyHackers, Canva, ProBlogger, Foundr, and thousands of other users

 

  1. Sprout Social

What It Does: Like MeetEdgar, Sprout Social is a social media management software with features including a unified Smart Inbox, social CRM tools, advanced scheduling tools, social media monitoring, sophisticated analytics, and team collaboration tools.

Who Else is Using It: UPS, Ticketmaster, Stanford University, Bentley, Hyatt, Evernote, Grubhub, and 17,000 other users

 

  1. WeTransfer

What It Does: WeTransfer is a web-based file sharing service. It’s a really simple platform that only requires your recipient’s email address(es), your email address, and the files you are sending. You can send files as big as 2GB for free.

This is a great tool for quickly sharing files to schedule for social posts.
Who Else is Using It: Enough users to send 10 billion transfers in 2016

 

  1. Iconosquare

 What it Does: This is the go-to tool for scheduling Instagram posts. What stinks about scheduling Instagram posts is that because Instagram doesn’t share their API, auto-posting is not an option. With Iconosquare, however, you can schedule posts and get notifications when it’s time to post. Plus, the analytics are some of the best and most in-depth out there for the platform.Who Else is Using It: FourSquare, KemperSports, Krupp Group Public Relations

 

  1. CoSchedule

What It Does: CoSchedule is a social media management tool, but it’s also a very powerful collaborative calendar. You can organize all of your social media posts, content, events, and tasks in one place. Plus, the ReQueue feature finds optimal posting times and fills in the gaps in your social calendar with your best performing posts.Who Else is Using It: Convince & Convert, Borshoff, Foundation Recovery Systems, Florida Realtors

 

  1. Buffer

What It Does: Buffer is a handy tool for scheduling and publishing posts across multiple social platforms. It also features analytics and allows for multiple users to collaborate at once.Who Else is Using It: Fortune Magazine, Business Insider, About.com, Seattle Times, the Denver Broncos

 

  1. Canva

What It Does: If you want to make quick and easy graphics but you’re not much of a graphic designer, this is the perfect tool for you. Canva is loaded with easy-to-use features and lets you create graphics with sizing for all the different social platforms.

Who Else is Using It: Over 10 million users

 

Conclusion

No matter what tools you decide to use to help manage your social media, make sure you take advantage of the many free tools out there. This is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to helpful software!

 

9 Tools for Optimizing your Website

When it comes to marketing in 2017, you want your website in tip-top shape for your users. Your website is your digital storefront. A slow-functioning site, poor user experience, or less than stellar content might as well be a dingy, unkempt shop that has your name and reputation on it.

But let’s be real— when you’re busy running a business, it’s difficult to stay on top of your website. Even if you outsource your web management to save yourself time, you can run into snags. Not every freelancer or agency can be trusted to produce the quality work you deserve. Going back to improve outsourced work is a waste of your time and money.

So how do you manage to optimize your website when you’re busy with clients and the thousands of other things you do to keep your business growing?

Luckily for you, there are some tools out there to help make the task of managing your website easier. Here are nine tools you should know about:

1. Copyscape
Whether you outsource your content or have it written in-house, it’s important that your content is not plagiarized. But you can hardly take the time to double-check by Googling chunks of your content line by line.

Enter Copyscape.

It’s a cloud-based content scanner that tells you how unique your content is, and whether or not it’s duplicated from some other content out there on the web. While the free version of Copyscape won’t scan unpublished content, the paid version allows you to scan content in draft form.

2. SEO for Chrome
If you’re a Chrome user, you know how useful toolbar extensions can be. SEO for Chrome allows you to instantly check up on your search engine ranking compared to your competitors. You can also analyze SEO to analyze PageRank.

SEO is available for the Firefox toolbar as well.

3. Google Webmaster Tools
This is an incredible free tool that sets you up for success when it comes to SEO. It includes very helpful features such as HTML improvements, a structured data testing tool, removes URLs, and a data highlighter. This is an especially helpful tool because it’s made by Google, the number one authority on search engine rankings.

4. Open Site Explorer (formerly SEOMoz)
This tool created by Moz offers a wide selection of optimization tools.
Some notable features include:
● Quickly finding backlinks
● Link analyzation with data demonstrating how those links can influence your ranking
● Competitor site comparison
● Free for a limited number of queries per day

5. Google Adwords Keyword Planner
This tool is the one-stop shop for figuring out what keywords you want to use. The Keyword Planner is perceptive and user-friendly, providing a rough estimate of traffic for each keyword, a mix and match keyword planning feature, and the ability to save multiple keyword lists.

6. KISSMetrics
Google Analytics is great for giving you insight into your website, but KISSMetrics takes it up a level. KISSMetrics gives you data on who specifically is visiting your website and taking action. This information is far more valuable and takes your insights deeper.

7. CrazyEgg
Have you ever wondered how a visitor’s eyes move across your web page? CrazyEgg gives you heat maps of your website that gives you insight into where your visitors click and how far down the page they scroll. This is especially helpful for determining where to place calls to action on your page.

8. Test my Site by think with Google
Did you know that most sites lose half their visitors while the site is loading? You can retain visitors simply by speeding up the load time of your site. Test my Site allows you to plug in your URL for free and gives you feedback on how fast your site is compared to others, and suggestions on how you can speed up your load time.

9. Sumo
Sumo is software as a services (SaaS) that helps you grow website traffic and conversions. This software works effectively to build lists of leads by placing unique pop-ups and share buttons in optimal locations on your pages. Sumo also features heat maps and real-time visitor analytics.

Conclusion
Don’t get caught with a less-than-optimized website. Take advantage of these tools, especially the free ones. If the ones listed above don’t fit your fancy, there are a plethora of other tools out there to improve your website.